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PRESS | August 27, 2015

The United Kingdom aims to sequence 100,000 human genomes by 2017. But screening them for disease-causing variants will require innovative software. For the 100,000 Genomes Project, it will use Omicia’s Opal Clinical genome interpretation software to assess which variants are likely to be causing disease.  

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Rare Genomics Institute (RG) is an international non-profit that that makes cutting edge research technologies of genome sequencing, physicians and scientists around the world accessible to rare disease patients. In partnership with RG, Omicia is delighted to announce the recipients of this year’s BeHEARD Rare Disease Science Challenge, who will receive free access to Omicia’s …

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Genomics England announce that it will be using technology co-developed in a partnership between Omicia and the University of Utah, and exclusively commercialized through Omicia, to interpret the DNA of Britons as part of the 100,000 Genomes Project, a national effort to hasten creation of diagnostics and treatments that are tailored to a person’s genetic …

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Omicia has been selected as a finalist for the Innovation Showcase at VentureBeat’s HealthBeat 2014 event.  As one of 10 finalists selected from dozens of startups in the digital health space, Omicia will have the opportunity to demonstrate how Opal Clinical will improve patient outcomes by increasing the accuracy, speed, and diagnostic yield of NGS …

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Disorder-causing mutations are hard to detect — they have to be identified among a host of other, innocuous genetic changes. Omicia’s software tools are profiled as Nature takes a look the tools physicians and researchers use to sift through sequenced genomes in search of such mutations.

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Researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and other institutions have applied a newly developed software tool, pVAAST, to identify genetic mutations that contribute to a person���s increased risk for developing common, complex diseases, such as cancer. The research is published in the May 2014 edition of the journal Nature Biotechnology.

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